Why is the government spending more on the NSA than it should?

It’s an ongoing debate about the national security state and what it should be doing to counter its growing power.And in an article published Tuesday, The Washington Post’s Ellen Nakashima reported on a new bill introduced by Republican Sen. Ron Johnson that would significantly increase the budget for the NSA.It would also provide $10 billion…

Published by admin inOctober 31, 2021
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It’s an ongoing debate about the national security state and what it should be doing to counter its growing power.

And in an article published Tuesday, The Washington Post’s Ellen Nakashima reported on a new bill introduced by Republican Sen. Ron Johnson that would significantly increase the budget for the NSA.

It would also provide $10 billion to help the agency hire more people and train more analysts.

The proposed legislation, called the OPEN Act, is designed to help prevent future blowback by increasing oversight and transparency of the NSA, Nakashim reported.

Johnson, a former U.S. Marine Corps fighter pilot and former prosecutor, introduced the bill on the same day that President Donald Trump signed an executive order barring the agency from sharing any U.N. Security Council resolutions that would be considered harmful to U.K. interests with the White House.

In an interview Tuesday with The Washington Examiner, Johnson said he supported the OPEN bill as a means of addressing “legitimate concerns.”

“We have to do what we can to ensure that we’re protecting the people of the United States from foreign powers that are trying to influence our elections,” Johnson said.

The OPEN Act passed the Senate Armed Services Committee on Wednesday.

It passed the House Armed Services and Intelligence committees last week.

Johnson told Nakashiman that the bill is intended to “re-engage” the U..

S., but also that it could help the White, Congressional, and media communities understand what the NSA is doing and what is being done with it.

“What the OPEN act does is it re-engages the U